Sky: Sizewell C nuclear plant will help kick-start post-pandemic economy, says EDF

https://news.sky.com/story/sizewell-c-nuclear-plant-will-help-kick-start-post-pandemic-economy-says-edf-11995372

Campaigners criticise the application, arguing COVID-19 restrictions will curb public participation in the planning process.

A planned new nuclear power station will help kick-start the economy following the coronavirus crisis, energy giant EDF has said.

The power supplier has submitted an application to build the Sizewell C plant on the Suffolk coast, which it says will generate enough electricity to power six million homes and bolster the UK’s energy resilience by reducing the need for imports.

EDF also says it will create 25,000 jobs and 1,000 apprenticeships during construction, as well as providing 900 skilled jobs over its lifetime.

The application for development consent to the Planning Inspectorate was delayed for two months due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

But campaigners opposed to the project have criticised the move, arguing that coronavirus social distancing restrictions are likely to continue in the coming months and so limiting public participation in the planning process.

The 3.2-gigawatt Sizewell C will be a near replica of Hinkley Point C in Somerset, reducing construction costs and risks, according to EDF, which has partnered with China General Nuclear to build reactors in the UK.

Humphrey Cadoux-Hudson, managing director of the Sizewell C project, said: “Sizewell C is a net-zero infrastructure project ready to kick-start the economy following the coronavirus crisis.

“It will offer thousands of high-quality job opportunities and long-term employment for people living in Suffolk and it will strengthen the nuclear supply chain across the country.

“The project will play a key role in lowering emissions while helping the UK keep control of its low carbon future.”

He said the construction of Sizewell C will prevent nine million tonnes of carbon dioxide being pumped into the atmosphere each year, compared to electricity generated by gas plants.

The planning process is likely to take 18 months to complete and the government will make the final decision on whether to give the green light to the scheme.

The Stop Sizewell C campaign group which opposes the scheme warns it is costly, diverts investment from other green energy sources such as renewables and would damage tourism and nature in the area.

Alison Downes, of Stop Sizewell C, also criticised the move to submit the application during lockdown.

She said: “With restrictions set to last many months, there cannot be full public participation in the planning process – even the Planning Inspectorate does not yet know how it could work.

“Sizewell C would be an expensive bridge to nowhere: it will suck vital funds away from the technologies and projects that are more capable of truly transforming our energy landscape.”

Independent: New nuclear power plant planned for Suffolk coast ‘would be devastating’ for wildlife

https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/sizewell-c-nuclear-power-plant-wildlife-edf-energy-a9534631.html

EDF Energy applies for permission to build twin-reactor power station that could generate low-carbon electricity for six million homes, but plans prompt outcry over ‘disastrous’ impact on nature

An energy firm has submitted controversial plans for a nuclear power station that opponents warn will be “catastrophic” for wildlife on the Suffolk coast.

EDF Energy formally requested government permission to build Sizewell C, a 3.2-gigawatt twin-reactor plant that it says would generate enough low-carbon electricity to power six million homes.

But the proposals have been opposed by a string of environmental and nature groups, including the National Trust, as well as local campaigners who fear the coronavirus pandemic will prevent their voices being heard.

EDF delayed its submission to the Planning Inspectorate for two months due to the outbreak of Covid-19, but applied for a development consent order on Wednesday.

The French energy giant, which has partnered with state-owned China General Nuclear to build reactors in the UK, said construction of the plant would be a “huge economic boost” to the region and would create 25,000 jobs and 1,000 apprenticeships. The site would employ 900 staff once operational, the company added.

Humphrey Cadoux-Hudson, the project’s managing director, said: “Sizewell C is a net zero infrastructure project ready to kick-start the economy following the coronavirus crisis.

“On top of the economic benefits, Sizewell C will avoid nine million tonnes of CO2 being pumped into the atmosphere each year. The project will play a key role in lowering emissions while helping the UK keep control of its low carbon future.”

But local campaign group Stop Sizewell C said the proposed plant was the “wrong project in the wrong place”. They have outlined a range of concerns including the diversion of investment from other green energy sources, damage to tourism and nature, and plans to store nuclear waste on the eroding Suffolk coastline.

Alison Downes, the group’s executive director, said: “Sizewell C would be an expensive bridge to nowhere: it will suck vital funds away from the technologies and projects that are more capable of truly transforming our energy landscape.”

She also criticised EDF’s decision to submit its application during the coronavirus lockdown, which she warned meant “there cannot be full public participation in the planning process”.

The National Trust, Suffolk Wildlife Trust (SWT) and RSPB all said the energy firm had failed to provide evidence that its plans would not threaten the area’s rare animal species and protected habitats.

The RSPB said construction may increase erosion and disrupt water levels in neighbouring Minsmere nature reserve, which would be potentially “catastrophic” for species including bitterns, water voles, and otters.

“EDF have not presented us with sufficient evidence that these disastrous impacts can be avoided,” said Adam Rowlands, the RSPB’s area manager for Suffolk. “Without this evidence, we have been forced to conclude, given the levels of uncertainty, that the build must not go ahead given its anticipated impacts on the environment.”

Ben McFarland, SWT’s head of conservation, warned the plans also “suggest the direct loss of nationally important and protected land” on Sizewell Belts, a Site of Special Scientific Interest.

He said: “An area between 10-12 hectares — or roughly ten football pitches — will be covered in concrete. The loss of this nationally rare fen habitat would be devastating and irreplaceable.”

The National Trust has written to the leaders of East Suffolk Council and Suffolk County Council to say it is “deeply concerned” about the plant’s potential impact on Dunwich Heath, an “irreplaceable stretch of the Suffolk coast”.

EDF said it “takes its responsibilities to the environment and local communities seriously and our proposals will provide a biodiversity net gain to the area”.

A spokesperson added: “We have a good track record of looking after nature around our operating power station at Sizewell B and have been awarded the Wildlife Trusts’ Biodiversity Benchmark in recognition of conservation work on the Sizewell estate.”

The company promised to put in place additional measures to make it easier for the public to scrutinise its proposals.

The planning process is likely to take 18 months to complete and the government will make the final decision on whether the project should go ahead.

Sizewell C is planned to be a near replica of Somerset’s Hinkley Point C, which EDF said would reduce construction costs and risks.

But Hinkley Point C, the UK’s first new nuclear power plant since 1995, has been beset by delays and soaring costs. It is now expected to be completed eight years late in 2025 at a cost of £22.5bn, more than double the original estimate.

Daily Mail: Campaigners slam ‘disastrous’ plans for £18billion EDF nuclear plant in Suffolk

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8359739/EDF-seeks-building-consent-Britains-Sizewell-C-nuclear-plant.html

  • Plant expected to generate enough low-carbon electricity for 6million homes  
  • Businesses and unions backed move which could create more than 25,000 jobs
  • But conservationists say it will concrete over an area of precious marshland 

A new £18billion nuclear plant in Suffolk that would be a near replica of Hinkley Point C threatens to destroy ‘irreplaceable’ natural habitats for rare wildlife including water voles, otters, bitters and hen harriers, conservationists have warned.

Planning documents were lodged today for Sizewell C, which EDF says will generate enough ‘always-on’ low-carbon electricity to power six million homes and create 25,000 jobs and 1,000 apprenticeships during construction.

Hinckley Point is the £21.5bn nuclear plant with two reactors announced by the David Cameron government in 2010, which is expected to begin operating in 2025 after being built in a partnership between EDF state-owned CGN of China.

Business and unions welcomed today’s move, but charities including the National Trust and RSPB criticised as ‘disastrous’ plans to concrete over a large area of rare marshland.

Sizewell C will provide 900 skilled jobs over its operating lifetime and support UK energy resilience by meeting seven percent of its demand for electricity, thus reducing the need for imports, EDF said.

The application for a development consent order to the Planning Inspectorate was delayed for two months due to the coronavirus pandemic, but questions have been raised about the decision to put in the submission during lockdown.

EDF said extra measures will be put in place to make it easier for local communities to scrutinise the proposals once they are published.

But wildlife groups have said the scheme should not go ahead as it will harm important habitats around the site on the Suffolk coast.

Suffolk Wildlife Trust (SWT) said construction would lead to the loss of rare fen habitat.

Ben McFarland, SWT’s conservation manager, said: ‘Current plans suggest the direct loss of nationally important and protected land on Sizewell Belts, a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI).

‘An area between 10-12 hectares – or roughly 10 football pitches – will be covered in concrete. The loss of this nationally rare fen habitat would be devastating and irreplaceable.’

The RSPB said the development would affect its Minsmere nature reserve, potentially affecting water levels in the wetlands which would harm rare wildlife such as water voles, bitterns and otters.

Noise and light pollution from construction would have a detrimental effect on marsh harriers and wading birds, the wildlife charity said.

Some local residents have objected to the application being submitted while there are still restrictions on public gatherings that would allow local people to discuss such plans.

EDF’s Hinkley Point C project, which will be Britain’s first new nuclear plant in almost two decades when complete, has suffered several delays is now expected to cost around 21.5-22.5 billion pounds. Pictured is a recent photo of the construction site

The Stop Sizewell C campaign group which opposes the scheme warns it is costly, diverts investment from other green energy sources such as renewables and would damage tourism and nature in the area.

But Justin Bowden, GMB union national secretary, said: ‘GMB welcomes the EDF planning consent order application which will be crucial if the UK is to have sufficient reliable energy to keep the lights on, homes and businesses powered and to meet net-zero targets.

‘A balanced energy mix, which includes new nuclear and green gas, is crucial as intermittent wind and solar on their own cannot meet the UK’s energy needs.’

John Dugmore, chief executive of Suffolk Chamber of Commerce, said: ‘The Suffolk business community is very supportive of this crucial project, both in terms of potential contracts and the skills boost.’

The planning process is likely to take 18 months to complete and the Government will make the final decision on whether to give the green light to the scheme.

EDF’s Hinkley Point C project, which will be Britain’s first new nuclear plant in almost two decades when complete, has suffered several delays is now expected to cost around 21.5-22.5 billion pounds.

EDF expects Sizewell C to be around 20% cheaper than Hinkley.

China’s CGN, which has a 33.5% stake in Hinkley C also has a 20% stake in the development phase of Sizewell C.

The Times: New Sizewell C nuclear power station poses threat to rare birds, says National Trust

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/new-sizewell-c-nuclear-power-station-poses-threat-to-rare-birds-says-national-trust-97vpn059f

A new nuclear power station planned for the Suffolk coast would threaten rare wildlife on protected heathland, according to the National Trust.

It has condemned EDF’s application, expected to be submitted to the Planning Inspectorate tomorrow, to build twin reactors at Sizewell in a project that the French state-controlled company says would supply enough low carbon electricity for six million homes, or 7 per cent of UK power.

The trust owns Dunwich Heath, 140 acres of lowland heathland that is one of Britain’s rarest habitats and is home to a breeding population of endangered stone curlews.

It has written to the leaders of East Suffolk council and Suffolk county council to raise concerns about the proposed £18 billion plant, which EDF would build with theChinese nuclear power company China General Nuclear (CGN).

Nick Collinson, the trust’s general manager for the Suffolk and Essex Coast, wrote: “The National Trust is deeply concerned about the current proposals for Sizewell C and the impact they could have on the wildlife, views and visitor experience of Dunwich Heath, and this irreplaceable stretch of the Suffolk coast.”

Mr Collinson expressed concern that EDF was going ahead with the application during the coronavirus lockdown, when organisations that wanted to respond and raise specific concerns had limited capacity to do so.

He added: “We are concerned that EDF has failed to provide important information on key topic areas. The absence of information has prevented the National Trust, and other stakeholders, from being able to fully consider both the short and long-term impacts of the proposal on our property and the experience that we can offer our visitors and members.

“It has also hindered us in being able to give meaningful consideration to any appropriate monitoring, mitigation or compensation.”

The trust’s concerns include the impact of dust and traffic from the construction of the power station and the visual blight caused by pylons and power lines. It also fears that the development could displace recreational activity from Sizewell to Dunwich Heath, which is about 3km (less than two miles) north of the proposed power station site.

Stop Sizewell C, a local campaign group, said the power stations “would be an expensive bridge to nowhere: it will suck vital funds away from the technologies and projects that are more capable of truly transforming our energy landscape”.

Last month a group of celebrities with homes in the area or links to it, including the actors Bill Nighy and David Morrissey and the painter Maggi Hambling, called on the government to step in to delay consideration of the proposal until the coronavirus restrictions were lifted.

Mr Nighy, who used to live in Theberton with his former partner, the actress Diana Quick, said: “It is beyond belief that EDF is pressing forward during these terrible and uncertain times with a project so misguided, and which even the government’s own advisers find deeply concerning.

“If Sizewell C is allowed to go ahead we will be left with an outdated form of energy that will not fit to any degree in our new world, and this internationally famous environment will be desecrated. This is a time to protect our ecosystems, not shatter them.”

The new station would be next to Sizewell B, Britain’s most modern nuclear power station, which opened in 1995.

EDF and CGN are building the £22 billion Hinkley Point C in Somerset, the first new nuclear power station for a generation. It has been repeatedly delayed.

EDF has proposed an alternative funding model for Sizewell C under which consumers would share the risk of cost overruns and delays by paying for the project while it was still under construction. EDF said the alternative funding model could make nuclear power comparable in cost to offshore wind.

A full public examination of the application is expected in the autumn.

BBC: Planning Application for nuclear plant submitted

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-suffolk-52813171 27 May 2020

An application has been submitted to build a new nuclear power station capable of powering six million homes.

EDF Energy has put in plans for the Sizewell C plant on the Suffolk coast, first proposed more than a decade ago.

Alison Downes, of Stop Sizewell C, said the project would “suck vital funds” away from other technologies.

Managing director of the Sizewell C project, Humphrey Cadoux-Hudson, said it would “kick-start the economy following the coronavirus crisis”.

He said the 3.2GW plant would generate enough “always-on” low-carbon electricity to power six million homes, creating 25,000 jobs and 1,000 apprenticeships during construction.
EDF Energy added the scheme would reduce the need for imported energy.

‘Bridge to nowhere’

The application for a development consent order to the Planning Inspectorate was delayed for two months amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Sizewell C would be a near replica of the under-construction Hinkley Point C in Somerset, reducing construction costs and risks, according to EDF.

But Mrs Downes said: “Sizewell C would be an expensive bridge to nowhere: it will suck vital funds away from the technologies and projects that are more capable of truly transforming our energy landscape.”

She said while coronavirus lockdown restrictions continued there could not be “full public participation in the planning process – even the Planning Inspectorate does not yet know how it could work”.

EDF Energy said extra measures would be put in place to make it easier for the proposals to be scrutinised once they were published.
Mr Cadoux-Hudson said: “Sizewell C is a net-zero infrastructure project ready to kick-start the economy following the coronavirus crisis.

“The project will play a key role in lowering emissions while helping the UK keep control of its low carbon future.”

The planning process is likely to take 18 months to complete with the government making the final decision.

Sizewell was highlighted by the government as being suitable for a future nuclear power station in 2010, when it selected eight sites around England and Wales from a longer list of potential locations.

There have been two power stations at Sizewell already – Sizewell A, which opened in the 1960s and shut in 2006, and Sizewell B, which opened in the 1990s and is still in operation.

ITV: Application for new Sizewell C Nuclear Power Plant in Suffolk has been submitted

https://www.itv.com/news/anglia/2020-05-27/application-for-new-sizewell-c-nuclear-power-plant-in-suffolk-has-been-submitted/

Energy giant EDF has submitted an application to build a new nuclear power station on the Suffolk coast.

The planned 3.2 gigawatt Sizewell C nuclear plant would generate enough “always-on” low-carbon electricity to power six million homes and create 25,000 jobs and 1,000 apprenticeships during construction, EDF said.

It will also provide 900 skilled jobs over its operating lifetime and support UK energy resilience by reducing the need for imports, the company said.

The application for a development consent order to the Planning Inspectorate was delayed for two months due to the coronavirus pandemic.

EDF said extra measures will be put in place to make it easier for local communities to scrutinise the proposals once they are published.

Sizewell C will be a near replica of Hinkley Point C in Somerset, reducing construction costs and risks, according to EDF, which has partnered with China General Nuclear to build reactors in the UK.
Hinkley Point C is under construction with a contract to receive a guaranteed price for its power, of #92.50 per megawatt of electricity it generates, which will drop to #89.50/MWh if Sizewell C goes ahead.

But with the price of other power sources such as offshore wind falling to much lower levels, an alternative funding model for nuclear schemes could be used which it is hoped will attract investment and bring down costs.

Humphrey Cadoux-Hudson, managing director of the Sizewell C project, said:
“Sizewell C is a net-zero infrastructure project ready to kick-start the economy following the coronavirus crisis.
“It will offer thousands of high-quality job opportunities and long-term employment for people living in Suffolk and it will strengthen the nuclear supply chain across the country.
“The project will play a key role in lowering emissions while helping the UK keep control of its low carbon future.”
– HUMPHREY CADOUX-HUDSON, MANAGING DIRECTOR

He said the construction of Sizewell C will prevent nine million tonnes of carbon dioxide being pumped into the atmosphere each year, compared to electricity generated by gas plants.
The planning process is likely to take 18 months to complete and the Government will make the final decision on whether to give the green light to the scheme.

The Stop Sizewell C campaign group which opposes the scheme warns it is costly, diverts investment from other green energy sources such as renewables and would damage tourism and nature in the area.

Alison Downes, of Stop Sizewell C, also criticised the move to submit the application during lockdown.
“With restrictions set to last many months, there cannot be full public participation in the planning process – even the Planning Inspectorate does not yet know how it could work.” “Sizewell C would be an expensive bridge to nowhere: it will suck vital funds away from the technologies and projects that are more capable of truly transforming our energy landscape.”
– ALISON DOWNES, STOP SIZEWELL C

EADT: EDF goes ahead with Sizewell C application despite local objection

https://www.eadt.co.uk/news/edf-sizewell-development-consent-order-application-1-6671182

Energy giant EDF Energy has today submitted plans for the new Sizewell C nuclear power station on the Suffolk coast.

The company confirmed it had applied to the planning inspector for a development consent order (DCO) to build the twin reactor.

The announcement followed weekend reports that EDF was expected to make the application this Wednesday – sparking anger among community leaders and opposition groups which called for plans to be put on hold until lockdown restrictions were lifted.

EDF said extra measures for public scrutiny of proposals will include extending the period for interested parties to register with the planning inspectorate.

EDF said construction will create 25,000 job opportunities and 1,000 apprenticeships – bringing a huge economic boost to the region and strengthening the energy supply chain after coronavirus.

The GMB Union welcomed news of the application, calling it “vital to the UK’s energy future and economic prosperity of Suffolk”.

It follows four controversial stages of public consultation since 2012 and will begin with a 28-day period for the inspector to assess the application before documents are made available for public examination – probably not until autumn – ahead of a final decision being taken by the government.

Humphrey Cadoux-Hudson CBE, managing director of the project, said the net-zero carbon project would “kick-start” the economy following coronavirus, offer job opportunities and long-term employment for people in Suffolk and strengthen the UK’s nuclear supply chain.

“On top of the economic benefits, Sizewell C will avoid nine million tonnes of CO2 being pumped into the atmosphere each year,” he added.

“The project will play a key role in lowering emissions while helping the UK keep control of its low carbon future.”

John Dugmore, chief executive of Suffolk Chamber of Commerce, said Sizewell C would boost local training and employment while attracting investment to regenerate rural areas and towns.

Earlier this week, the National Trust expressed “deep concern” over the impact of the proposed plant on an “irreplaceable stretch” of coast and said EDF had failed to provide important information on key topic areas to fully consider the impacts.

Opposition group Stop Sizewell C accused EDF of “riding roughshod over lockdown”, with spokeswoman Alison Downes calling on the inspectorate to reject the application on the basis of what MP Dan Poulter described as EDF’s “unacceptable” lack of engagement with local communities following the end of consultation.

The group accused EDF of ignoring appeals to delay submitting a DCO application for the plant, which it said was too big for the site and surrounded by internationally-protected habitats, including the Minsmere nature reserve.

Paul Collins, of Stop Sizewell C and the Minsmere Levels Stakeholder Group, said: “It will be at least 15 years before Sizewell C is carbon neutral, and the unsuitability and sensitivity of the site makes any argument in favour of construction to help economic recovery frankly insulting.”

Last September, research by the Suffolk Coast Destination Management Organisation claimed 400 jobs and between £24m and £40m a year of tourism money could be lost as a result of Sizewell C and onshore infrastructure for ScottishPower Renewables wind farms.

EDF countered claims by arguing a survey had shown construction of sister station Hinkley Point C, in Somerset, had not affected visitor perception or business confidence.

The Suffolk Coast & Heaths Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) Partnership said EDF had not properly assessed the impact on the national landscape and the environment.

Simon Amstutz, manager at the Suffolk Coast & Heaths Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), said the partnership’s concerns included the impact of the new buildings, proposed new pylons and roads.

City AM: EDF submits planning application for Sizewell C nuclear power station

 

EDF submits planning application for Sizewell C nuclear power station

EDF has this morning submitted an application to build the new Sizewell C nuclear power plant on the Suffolk coast to the Planning Inspectorate.

The plant, which the French firm is developing in partnership with China’s state-owned nuclear company CGN, will be a near replica of Hinkley Point C in Somerset.

Upon completion, the power station is expected to supply energy to around 6m homes in the east of England, and will employ 900 people.

During the construction phase, the project will create 25,000 job opportunities as well as 1,000 apprenticeships.

Over the course of its lifetime, the power station is expected to contribute £4bn to the region’s economy.

John Dugmore, chief executive of the Suffolk Chamber of Commerce, said that the county’s business community was “very supportive” of the project:

“Sizewell C is a huge opportunity for Suffolk companies from all sectors and we are working hard through the Sizewell C supply chain portal to make sure they reap the benefits. The

By copying the Hinkley Point model, it is hoped that the project will be 20 per cent cheaper than its predecessor, which is expected to cost up to £22.5bn.

The application process is expected to take about 18 months to complete, with the government to have the final say on whether the project will go ahead.

If it is approved, EDF say that it will take roughly a decade to build the power station.

However, the process is unlikely to be without challenge, with certain stakeholders already voicing their concerns over the project.

The Stop Sizewell C campaign group has hit out at the project’s developers for “riding roughshod” over the coronavirus lockdown restrictions, claiming local residents will not be able to participate fully in the planning process.

Alison Downes, a spokesperson for the group, said: “With restrictions set to last many months there cannot be full public participation in the planning process – even the Planning Inspectorate does not yet know how it could work”

EDF said that the application had been delayed for two months in light of the coronavirus situation and that extra measures would be put in place to make it easier for local residents to scrutinise the plans once they have been published.

The group has also pointed to the fact that the new project’s predecessor Sizewell B has been running at 50 per cent capacity during the current crisis due to the lack of energy demand as evidence for the inflexible nature of nuclear energy.

The power station is also likely to attract the attention of those currently urging the government to reduce the role of Chinese firms in the UK’s critical national infrastructure.

As with telecoms giant Huawei, which prime minister Boris Johnson is reportedly planning to phase out of the UK’s 5G networks by 2023, CGN is blacklisted in the US over accusations of stealing nuclear secrets.

According to the Financial Times, Johnson has asked officials to draw up plans as to how to reduce Chinese investment in the UK.

Le Monde de l’energie: EDF candidat à la construction d’une nouvelle centrale nucléaire au Royaume-Uni

EDF candidat à la construction d’une nouvelle centrale nucléaire au Royaume-Uni

 

Le géant français de l’énergie EDF annonce mercredi avoir déposé une demande pour construire une nouvelle centrale nucléaire au Royaume-Uni, le projet Sizewell C, sur le modèle de celle de Hinkley Point.

La candidature a été soumise avec deux mois de retard en raison de la crise du coronavirus, explique EDF Energy, la filiale britannique du groupe, dans un communiqué.

Le processus de sélection devrait prendre 18 mois et ce sera ensuite au gouvernement de valider ou non ce projet de centrale, laquelle se situera dans le Suffolk, sur la côté est anglaise, et sera équipée de deux réacteurs EPR.

D’une puissance totale de 3,2 GW, Sizewell C pourra fournir de l’électricité à 6 millions de foyers et sa construction devrait créer 25.000 emplois, selon EDF.

“Sizewell C est un projet d’infrastructure neutre en émissions carbone et de nature à relancer l’économie après la crise du coronavirus”, estime Humphrey Cadoux-Hudson, directeur général de Sizewell C.

“Il permettra de créer des emplois hautement qualifiés et de long terme pour la population du Suffolk et renforcera l’industrie du nucléaire à travers le pays”, selon lui.

Sur le site de Sizewell, il existe deux centrales, Sizewell A ouverte dans les années 1960 et fermée en 2006, et Sizewell B, ouverte en 1995 et encore en opération.

La centrale sera une quasi-réplique de Hinkley Point dans le Somerset (sud-ouest de l’Angleterre) et sera comme cette dernière développée par EDF aux côtés du chinois CGN. Cela devrait permettre selon EDF de réduire les risques et les coûts pour cette nouvelle centrale.

Hinkley Point C a été validé par le gouvernement britannique en 2016 et est la seule centrale nucléaire en cours de construction dans le pays.

Mais le projet a subi des dépassements de budget si bien que EDF a revu en 2019 en hausse son coût, estimé désormais entre 21,5 et 22,5 milliards de livres.

Censée être livrée à partir de la fin 2025, bien qu’ EDF ait prévenu d’un risque de retard, cette centrale doit fournir 7% des besoins en électricité britanniques.

Ces différents projets doivent prendre le relais des centrales nucléaires construites au XXe siècle qui ont fermé ou sont sur le point d’arriver en fin de vie.

Ils sont en outre cruciaux pour EDF qui a connu des déboires avec ses réacteurs de troisième génération EPR, notamment à Flamanville.

Le projet de Sizewell rencontre l’opposition des associations écologistes.

Le mouvement Stop Sizewell C estime qu’il est trop coûteux, se fait au détriment de l’investissement dans les énergies vertes et va avoir un impact sur le tourisme et la nature dans la région.

Pour l’ONG Greenpeace, “le soutien en faveur du nucléaire est difficile à expliquer compte tenu des alternatives moins chères, plus sûres, plus rapides et bien plus populaires qui sont privilégiées dans la plupart du reste du monde”.

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: